2012 Edmonds Christmas Bird Count

December 22, 2012

The results of the 2012 count--123 species and 42,826 individual birds--easily surpassed the 28-year average counts of 105 species and 27,096 individual birds.  In addition to the 123 species seen on the count day, two count week species were seen on the Edmonds waterfront:  2 Ancient Murrelets and 100 Brant. 
 
There are 13 count areas within the 15-mile diameter CBC and the results from each count area can be seen on the 2012 CBC Report.  The location of each count area can be seen on the Edmonds CBC Map.  Sixty eight field observers and 14 feeder/yard observers participated in the CBC (Area Leaders and Participants).
 
Notable rare species reported during this CBC include the Redhead (3 on Shadow Lake in the Bob Heirman Wildlife Reserve and 1 on Lake Washington), Cinnamon Teal (3 in North Creek wetlands), Ring-necked Pheasant (1 in Area 5-North), and Savannah Sparrow (5 in Area 7-South), and Common Redpoll (5 in Willis Tucker Park).  Ten uncommon species reported include Green Heron, Rough-legged Hawk, Northern Shrike, Hutton’s Vireo, Common Raven, Orange-crowned Warbler, White-throated Sparrow, Western Meadowlark, Red Crossbill, and Evening Grosbeak.   See the CBC report for the locations where these birds were seen or heard.
 
High or near high counts (Table 1) were reported for 20 and 2 species, respectively.
 
Table 1.  High or near high counts for bird species seen during the 2012 Edmonds Christmas
                Bird Count on December 22, 2012 compared to the 28-year records.
Species
High in
2012
Previous
    
 High      Year
Count1
Snow Goose
4913
2500
2011
10
Cackling Goose
943
158
2011
4
Canada Goose
1158
703
2006
28
Cinnamon Teal
3
3
1999
3
Surf Scoter
834
842
1999
28
Red-throated Loon
13
13
2007
19
Pacific Loon
78
32
2007
21
Pigeon Guillemot
15
14
2001
25
Eurasian Collared-Dove
35
4
2011
2
Belted Kingfisher
18
18
2003
27
Hairy Woodpecker
21
19
2011
25
Northern Shrike
3
3
1998
10
Steller’s Jay
175
110
2011
28
Brown Creeper
28
24
2007
26
Pacific Wren
98
99
1989
28
Orange-crowned Warbler
2
2
1999
12
Audubon’s Yellow-rumped Warbler
20
13
2009
8
Spotted Towhee
237
171
2011
28
Fox Sparrow
144
94
2003
28
Song Sparrow
574
507
2000
28
Pine Siskin
3198
1976
2007
27
Red Crossbill
163
57
2010
9
Note:   1. The count is the number of years the bird was seen in the prior 28 years.
 
Notable misses on count day include the Brandt’s Cormorant, Brant, California Quail, Marbled Murrelet, and the Barn and Great Horned Owls.  The low numbers of Brandt’s Cormorant, Marbled Murrelet and California Quail normally seen in the area during the winter make them an easy miss.  There is, however, a small population of quail that is normally seen monthly on the north side of the Big Gulch in Mukilteo, but they were not present during the count week.  Black Brant and the Barn and Great Horned Owls appear to be a hit or miss birds during our CBC.

Only three owls were reported, all from feeder/yard counts.  One Barred Owl and one Screech Owl were seen or heard in the Scriber Creek watershed in Brier, and one Barred Owl was reported from a heavily wooded area in southeast Everett.  There was also one count week Screech Owl reported in Bothell by a former Pilchuck Audubon Society board member.  A doubling of the nocturnal effort from 2011 by members of the field teams was unsuccessful.

Anna’s Hummingbirds and Townsend’s Warblers are trending up over the past 10 years and Eurasian Collared-Doves since they first were seen in 2010.  Anna’s first appeared in the count in 1999, and in the last 10 years an average of 38 hummers has been seen.  In 2011, 91 Anna’s were observed and 77 this year.  Townsend’s Warblers are only slightly trending up.   Two doves first appeared in 2010, 4 last year, and 35 in 2012.

Waterfowl counts in the Edmonds CBC show a declining trend for 7 species.  However, only Canvasback, Black Scoter, and Ruddy Duck may be declining when the survey results of the three adjacent CBCs--Everett, Edmonds, and Seattle—are considered.   The other declining species in the Edmonds CBC—Green-winged Teal, Northern Pintail, Ring-necked Duck, and Common Goldeneye—were seen at near average to record high counts in the adjacent CBCs.

The passerines continue to be present at expected or better than expected levels led by record numbers of Spotted Towhees (247), Fox Sparrows (144), and Song Sparrows (574).  In 2011, the five species of woodpeckers –Red-breasted, Downy, Hairy, Northern Flicker, and Pileated—were reported at record high or above average (27-year) levels.  This trend continued in 2012.

An excellent effort, totaling over 180 observation hours, was made by 68 field and 14 feeder/yard observers.  Over 57 miles were covered by foot, 369 miles by car, 1 mile by boat, and 21.5 miles of nocturnal birding occurred.
 
2015 results
2014
 results
2013
 results
2012 results
2011 results