Current news and information:


June 30, 2016

Pilchuck Audubon Society’s response to bird abatement strategies being­ implemented at the Port of Everett 

 

Like other members of the birding community, Pilchuck Audubon Society is shocked and disturbed by the Port of Everett’s strategy of hanging dead birds as an abatement tactic to deter gulls from their facilities. We understand the issues and concerns that birds can cause at Port facilities, including airports and waterfront properties, but are confident there are other cost effective measures for bird abatement that could have been employed.

 For most people, birds represent an amazing part of our ecology and landscapes, including coastal and waterfront areas, so we understand and share our community’s distress with the Port’s decision to implement a “dead bird” strategy to scare gulls away from roosting, foraging and nesting areas.

 Pichuck Audubon Society would like to extend an invitation to meet with the Port of Everett for a discussion of the challenges they face at their facilities with respect to birds. We’d welcome a discussion of how we might support alternatives for avian management/avian protection plans. In many respects, birds are our business and we work every day toward conserving their populations and habitat…including along the Everett waterfront.

 

JULY PROGRAM MEETING

Friday, July 8, 2016

7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

Stanwood Public Library

9701 271st St NW, Stanwood, WA 98292

"Assessing Effects of Estuary Restoration Projects on Bird Populations"

Tom Virzi of Ecostudies will be giving this presentation.  In 2016, Ecostudies Institute began a multi-year monitoring program investigating the response of bird populations to estuary restoration projects at Leque Island and Fir Island Farm. Both sites are former estuarine wetlands that were diked in the late-1800s, and restoration is currently planned by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to return habitat to more natural conditions. Pre-restoration monitoring of bird populations (including shorebirds, wading birds, landbirds and raptors) began in winter 2016 to obtain baseline data for comparison. Our main goals include: 1) quantifying the numerical response in species abundance by breeding and wintering birds at each restoration site, and 2) investigating changes in shorebird abundance and distribution across the greater Skagit-Stillaguamish estuary.

Tom joined the Ecostudies team in 2014 as the principal investigator studying the endangered Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow in the Florida Everglades. Tom brings a wealth of knowledge about the species and its habitat requirements, and Everglades restoration to his work. His research interests focus on studying the population ecology of threatened avian species, devoting particular attention to the effects of habitat restoration on bird populations.

Tom was previously the instructor of ornithology at Rutgers and always enjoyed bringing his passion for birds into the classroom. He maintains a philosophy that education is a critical component of scientific research that is often undervalued in its importance towards achieving conservation goals. Away from work, Tom is a true waterman spending his time surfing, kayaking and fishing.


 

Tie Dye Socks

Tie Dye Socks!

with April Richardson

Sunday, June 26, 2016 ~ 1:00 – 3:00pm

Edmonds Wildlife Habitat Native Plant Demonstration Garden

Artist Naturalist, April Richardson, will provide a bucket of indigo dye and instruction for tie-dying cotton socks for Father’s Day that flew by or for personal use.

Indigo is a plant-based non-toxic dye that permanently stains a deep, rich blue, so wear old clothes. Vinyl and nitrile gloves will be provided. The workshop is free, but donations to cover the cost of materials will be welcome.

Registration is required so we have enough socks, or bring your own. Please contact April, 425-293-2175, aprilrichardson1@msn.com.

Edmonds Wildlife Habitat Native Plant Demonstration Garden is located at the Willow Creek Hatchery on the NW corner of Pine Street and Edmonds Way (Highway 104). Street parking is available on Pine Street. There are a few parking spaces down the driveway for those with limited mobility.



US Forest Service Plans Massive Timber Sale in South Fork Stillaguamish Watershed



Pilchuck partners with Skykomish Valley Environmental and 

Economic Alliance (SVENA) to protect May Creek



Help Pilchuck Audubon by Shopping!

Amazon Smile

If you are shopping on Amazon, simply start on this page, http://tinyurl.com/smilepas, and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price to Pilchuck Audubon. Millions of products are eligible for donations. It couldn't be easier!




 
New website features:

The results of the 2015 Christmas Bird Counts are in!

Feeding Hummingbirds in the Winter--Wally Davis

People of PAS -- Paula Parsons

Photo Gallery -- David Richman, Edmonds

(The gallery will feature a Pilchuck photographer every few months.  If you would like to submit photos, please contact webmaster@pilchuckaudubon.org.)

Close Encounters of the Bird Kind -- Ken Longley

(This page features writings about birds.  If you have had a magical birding moment, consider writing it up and submitting it to webmaster@pilchuckaudubon.org)



 Upcoming Birding Trips

 



 Follow Pilchuck Audubon Society on

 Facebook and Twitter: @PilchuckAudubon


Attention members: Don't miss a single issue of Pilchuck Audubon's monthly newsletter, The Profile. The Profile is now delivered directly to your e-mail inbox! Please contact newsletter@pilchuckaudubon.org or 425.610.8027 and provide your current e-mail address. 

Website Manager:  webmaster@pilchuckaudubon.org